shutterstock_249665050If you suffer from skin disorders, this is your herb. Daisy, also known as bruisewort or woundwort, heals not only minor ills and wounds, but can also significantly help minimise eczema.


There is probably no need to introduce the daisy to most of our readers. It grows from spring until autumn and often plays a part in beautifying many households. We all agree that a daisy bouquet looks marvelous on the table – but its use doesn’t end there…


Beauty Times Seven
The common European daisy grows
2–6 inches tall and has deep green leaves arranged in ground roses. The flowers are yellow, while petals vary between white and rose. Daisies can be found almost everywhere in Europe and grow across the globe—in gardens, pastures, on lawns, etc. Because daisies need a great deal of sunshine to grow, the perennial medicinal plant isn’t typically found in forests.

How to Pick Them
If you go picking daisies, make sure you put them in a basket. The healing parts are the leaves (good for the liver and the gallbladder) and flower heads with stalks (containing bitter substances, mucilage, essential oils, flavonoids, tannins, saponins, organic acids, minerals, inulin, and sugar). The flower heads are great for all skin disorders – acne, ulcers, wounds and even eczema. If used internally, they help with coughs, throat inflammation and bleeding gums. Daisy also helps treat the spleen, respiratory infections and influenza. In addition to all of this, it dehydrates and fights against swelling and pyoderma.


Perfect Medicine against Coughs
Daisy Syrup: Throw a handful of flowers into 1 pt boiling water and leave to stand for 12 hours. Strain through a cloth and boil the resulting juice again with 1 lb sugar until it thickens. Use 2-4 teaspoons to treat coughs.

Miracle for Allergy Sufferers
Add 5 tablespoons alcohol to 1 tablespoon flowers and leave to stand for 2 weeks in a closed jar. Add 10 drops of the resulting tincture into 1 tablespoon water and spread (ideally three times a day) over troubled spots.